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Organized Section 2: Law and Courts Best Graduate Student Paper Award

Law and Courts Section Award Recipients

Law and Courts Best Graduate Student Paper Award
Formerly the CQ Press Award, the Best Graduate Student Paper Award is given annually for the best paper in the field of law and courts written by a graduate student. To be eligible, the nominated paper must have been written by a full-time graduate student. Both single- and co-authored papers are eligible. In the case of co-authored papers, each author must have been a full-time graduate student at the time the paper was written. Submitted papers may have been written for any purpose (including papers written for seminar, scholarly meetings, and for potential publication in academic journals). This is NOT, however, a dissertation or thesis prize.


2017 David Gelman, University of Rochester
"The Beliefs and Behavior of Appellate Court Judges."
2017  Doug Johnson, University of Rochester
"The Beliefs and Behavior of Appellate Court Judges." 
2017  Natalie Rogol, Georgia State University
"Going Public: Presidential Impact on Supreme Court Decision-Making." 
2017  Matthew Montgomery, Georgia State University
"Going Public: Presidential Impact on Supreme Court Decision-Making."  
2017  Justin Kingsland, Georgia State University
"Going Public: Presidential Impact on Supreme Court Decision-Making."  
2016  Thomas Gray, University of Virginia
"Executive Influence on State Supreme Court Justices: Strategic Deference in Reappointment." 
2015  Monica E. Lineberger, University of South Carolina
"United Kingdom, United Courts? The Hierarchical Impact of Precedent in the British Judiciary.” presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association 2014. 
2015  Ali S. Masood, University of South Carolina
"United Kingdom, United Courts? The Hierarchical Impact of Precedent in the British Judiciary.” presented at the annual meeting of the Southern Political Science Association 2014. 
2014 Alicia Uribe, Washington University in St. Louis
"Binders Full of Judges: A Model for the Interdependency of Appointments to the U.S. Federal Judiciary."
2013 Doug Rice, Pennsylvania State University
"Measuring the Issue Content of Supreme Court Opinions through Probabilistic Topic Models"
2013 Honorable Mention
Deborah Beim, Princeton University
"Learning in the Judicial Hierarchy"
2013 Honorable Mention
Blake Emerson, Yale University
"The Empowerment of CriticismThe Freedmen’s Bureau, Howard University, and the Origins and Demise of Segregated Schooling in the South"
2013 Honorable Mention
Patrick Luff, University of Oxford
"Captured Legislators and Public-Interested Courts"
2012 Maya Sen, University of Rochester
Is Justice Really Blind: Race and Appellate Review in U.S. Courts
2012 Honorable Mention
Richard Price, Syracuse University
Arguing Gunwall: Can a State Supreme Court Force Its Lawyers to Argue State Constitutional Claims?
2011 Doug Rice, Pennsylvania State University
The Impact of Supreme Court Activity on the Judicial Agenda: Calling to Action or Settling the Law
2010 Shauhin Talesh, University of California, Berkeley
"Bargaining in the Shadow of ‘Shadow Law"
2009 Jonathan Kastellec, Princeton University
"Hierarchical and Collegial Politics on the U.S. Courts of Appeals"
2008 Tom Clark, Princeton University
"The Separation of Powers, Court-Curbing and Judiical Legitimacy"
2007 Shauhin Talesh, University of California, Berkeley
How Manufacturers Force Consumers to 'Holster' Consumer Warranty Protection Law 'Weapons'
2007 Douglas Kriner
Hail to the Chief? Two Mechanisms of Congressional Influence over Presidential War-Making
2006 Honorable Mention
Matthew Ingram, University of New Mexico
"Judicial Efficiency in 17 Mexico States, 1993-2000"
2004 Chad Westerland, SUNY Stony Brook
"Who Owns the Majority Opinion? Policy Making on the U. S. Supreme Court"
2004 Scott Hendrickson
"To DIG or Not to DIG: Using DIGs to Examine Supreme Court Decision Making and Agenda Setting"
2003 Lisa Solowiej, Binghamton Univ-SUNY
"Participation, Competition, and Conflict: Interest Groups in the US Supreme Court"
2003 Paul Collins Jr., Binghamton University
"Participation, Competition, and Conflict: Interest Groups in the US Supreme Court"
2002 Paul Collins Jr., Binghamton University
"Organized Interests in the Supreme Court: Gauging the Effectiveness of Amicus Curiae Participation"
2001 Alec Ewald, University of Massachusetts at Amherst
"Getting Ready for Garza? Judge Emilio Garza, Civil Liberties, and the Politics of Judicial Selection."
2000 Michael Ebeid, Yale University
"Do Presidents Shape Supreme Court Ideology? An Analysis of Judicial Agreement Tendencies"
1999 Joshua Clinton, Stanford University
"An Independent Judiciary? Determining the Influence of Congressional and Presidential Preferences on the Supreme Court's Interpretation of Federal Statutes: 1953-1995"
1999 Gretchen Helmke, University of Chicago
"Toward a Formal Theory of an Informal Institution: Insecure Tenure and Judicial Independence in Argentina, 1976-1995"
1998 Laura Langer, Florida State University
"State Supreme Courts and Countermajoritarian Behavior"
1997 Nancy Scherer, University of Chicago
"Reexamining the Politics of Crime in the Federal Courts: Are Bill Clinton’s Judicial Appointees ‘New’ Democrats or ‘Old’ Democrats?"
1996 Melissa Marschall, SUNY Stony Brook
"A NeoMarksist Model of Supreme Court/Congress/President Interaction: The Civil Rights Cases, 1953-1992"
1996 Andreas Broscheid, SUNY Stony Brook
"A NeoMarksist Model of Supreme Court/Congress/President Interaction: The Civil Rights Cases, 1953-1992"
1994 Nancy Crowe, University of Chicago
"Gender and Asset Settlements in Divorce Proceedings"
1993 Julie Novkov, University of Michigan
"Toward a Racist Theory of the State: Post-Civil War Anti-Mescegination Prosecutions"
1990 Andrew Koppelman, Yale University
"Forced Labor: A Thirteenth Amendment Defense of Abortion"
American Political Science Association
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