Skip to Content
Home » PUBLICATIONS » Journals » Perspectives On Politics
 

Perspectives on Politics

A Political Science Public Sphere


Perspective on PoliticsPerspectives on Politics seeks to provide a space for broad and synthetic discussion within the political science profession and between the profession and the broader scholarly and reading publics. Such discussion necessarily draws on and contributes to the scholarship published in the more specialized journals that dominate our discipline. At the same time, Perspectives seeks to promote a complementary form of broad public discussion and synergistic understanding within the profession that is essential to advancing research and promoting scholarly community.

Perspectives seeks to nurture a political science public sphere, publicizing important scholarly topics, ideas, and innovations, linking scholarly authors and readers, and promoting broad reflexive discussion among political scientists about the work that we do and why this work matters.

Editors:

Call for Proposals: Editor, Perspectives on Politics

Current Issue: Volume 13, Issue 4

Quoted out of “From the Editor” in the December Issue: As a political science journal, at the heart of everything we publish is vigorous peer-review, criticism, revision, and editing. . . . The current issue of our journal contains empirical research in a variety of forms. One is the more or less conventional form of most empirical research in U.S. political science—the quantitative analysis of empirical data. . . . At the same time, even the most conventionally “empirical” work that we publish is grounded in larger theoretical frameworks and normative concerns—Why do we care about inequality? Why do we care about civil wars? What’s the problem?—and thus draws on political theory broadly construed. . . . At the same time, our issue contains other work that is also empirical, though in a broader sense, through the employment of qualitative and historical methods and approaches. . . . This conception of political science is no doubt quaint in a great many ways. Yet Aristotle was onto something and we would do well to remember it: The methods of inquiry ought always to be determined by the objects and the purposes of inquiry. Political science is neither mathematics nor physics, neither rhetoric nor poetics. At its best, it furnishes partial and provisional understandings of a dense, opaque, and elusive social world.

See the table of contents

Click here for Membership Access»

Information about Perspectives

Submission Guidelines

A Statement on Scholarly Recognition

Copyright Agreement

Permissions

Advertising in Perspectives

Perspectives on Politics
Department of Political Science
Indiana University, Bloomington
Woodburn Hall 210
1100 E. 7th St.
Bloomington, Indiana 47405-7110

American Political Science Association
1527 New Hampshire Ave NW
Washington, DC 20036-1206
(202) 483-2512 • Fax: +1 (202) 483-2657

Scroll Up